Parasite

Parasite (15)

Much to everyone’s surprise—and delight—this South Korean film has become a true phenomenon following its historic and sweeping victory at this year’s Oscars, most notably becoming the first foreign-language film to win the coveted Best Film statuette.

Director Bong Joon Ho’s pitch-black modern fairytale tells the story of two families: the Park family: the picture of aspirational wealth and the Kim family, rich in street smarts but not much else. Whether by chance or fate, they are brought together and the Kims sense a golden opportunity to better their situation. Masterminded by college-aged Ki-woo, the Kim children install themselves as tutor and art therapist to the Parks and soon, a symbiotic relationship forms between the two families. The Kims provide “indispensable” luxury services while the Parks obliviously bankroll their entire household. When a parasitic interloper threatens the Kims’ newfound comfort, a savage, underhanded battle for dominance breaks out, threatening to destroy everything.

Friday, June 12th 2020
Doors open at 7pm
Film starts at 7.30pm

Director: Bong Joon Ho.
Year: 2019 (South Korea)
Certificate: 15
Running time: 2 hours
Korean with English subtitles

Tickets available online via Skiddle here.

And the critics say…

“A miracle of a film. It feels like Bong Joon-ho’s already extraordinary career has been building to this: a riotous social satire that’s as gloriously entertaining as it is deeply sardonic.” John Nugent, Empire magazine

“It tells a story you could probably follow without subtitles, or any dialogue at all: the faces of these actors show with piercing clarity how it feels to be outsiders in a world of wealth and privilege. ” Sarah Zacharek, Time

“Much like the Kims, a viewer can get lulled into luxuriating in the superficial details of the film. But it’s what’s lurking below the surface that will stay with you long after the movie is over.” Hau Chu, The Washington Post

“Bong Joon-ho’s bizarre black comedy about a rich Korean family and a poor one in a modern-day Downton Abbey situation gets its tendrils in you.” Peter Bradshaw,  The Guardian