Free Solo

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Free Solo (12A)

A stunning, intimate and unflinching portrait of free soloist climber Alex Honnold, as he prepares to achieve his lifelong dream: climbing the face of the world’s most famous rock … the 3,200-foot El Capitan in Yosemite National Park … without a rope. Celebrated as one of the greatest athletic feats of any kind, Honnold’s climb set the ultimate standard: perfection or death.

Free Solo is an edge-of-your seat thriller and an inspiring portrait of an athlete who challenges both his body and his beliefs on a quest to triumph over the impossible, revealing the personal toll of excellence. As Honnold starts his training, the armor of invincibility he’s built up over decades unexpectedly breaks apart when he begins to fall in love, threatening his focus and giving way to injury and setbacks. Directors Vasarhelyi and Chin succeed in beautifully capturing deeply human moments and the death-defying climb with exquisite artistry and masterful, vertigo-inducing camerawork. The result is a triumph, and celebration, of the human spirit.

Friday, April 26th 2019
Doors open at 7.30pm
Film starts at 8pm

Advance tickets are available oneline via Skiddle.

Upstairs@The Town Hall,
Llangollen Town Hall,
Castle Street, Llangollen

Directors: Jimmy Chin, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi
Year: 2018 (US)
Certificate: U
Running time: 1 hour 40 minutes

And the critics say…

“The vast, sublime shots of Honnold framed by trees and valleys far, far below, are simply magic. Terrifying, but magic.” Tara Brady, Irish Times

“The deftly captured footage of Honnold’s preparation with ropes (he falls often), and his execution without, is consistently difficult to watch without flinching. I barely exhaled for the duration of the film.” Kevin Maher, The Times

“I spent most of this film with my jaw on the floor.” Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian

“Despite the gravity-defying cinematography and alpine setting, “Free Solo” transcends the climbing world and intimately examines something universal.” Evan Bush, Seattle Times